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Creating Partitions

All versions of Window XP and 2003 including 32 bit and 64 bit

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Creating Partitions

Postby railcrzy » Wed Aug 25, 2004 1:36 pm

Im putting in a 80Gig hard drive. Im useing win 98se. I know how to format and create a partion, but I want to create 8 partions. Do I just not enable large dsik support and create extended dos each time and give it the amount of space desired.

Please help.

Thanks Larry
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Postby Geekgirl » Wed Aug 25, 2004 1:59 pm

Hey railcrzy

If you create more than four volumes you must use at least one extended partition.
Primary partitions are bootable, and logical drives are not. However, you may create up to only four primary partitions and if you want more drive lettes you must create an extended partition with logical drives.

Example:
if you create 4 primary partitions you will have C:,D: an E: and an F:. But suppose you create 3 primary partitions and extended partiton. You will then recieve the letters C:, D:, And E: then you can use the extended partition to create up to 21 logical drives lettered F: to Z: And logical drives cant contain an O.S. coz their not bootable.

Hope this helped, you seem to be on the right track
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Postby railcrzy » Wed Aug 25, 2004 3:38 pm

Thanks for replying Geekgirl,

So in my instance i want 8 partitions, with a 80Ghard drive.=10G a piece.

I would create 3 10G primary dos, and 1 extended and then I candidvide the extended in to the remainder?

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Postby Geekgirl » Wed Aug 25, 2004 7:06 pm

That sounds correct but...

If I'm not mistaken and I'm sure someone will correct me if Im wrong, normally you don't get the full 80Gig out of the drive. Check to see how much is available to use and do your dividing from there.
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Postby icecube » Fri Aug 27, 2004 6:24 am

What might be easier, is create a primary partition of 10 gig and set it as primary. Then take the rest of the space and create an extended partition. Then break the extended partition into logical drives.

You would do it the other way, if you were to have three different operationg systems. that way, you could selectivly make one partition active to boot to it.

This can turn into a real mess if you hook up a second hard drive. C remains C but D becomes E because the second drive becomes D. Then, any program installed to the original d drive will fail to run because its not on the new d drive.
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Postby Gecko » Fri Aug 27, 2004 12:07 pm

I have an 80 gig hard drive myself, and as Geekgirl said you won’t get the full 80 gigs.
Mine has 76.2 gigs of usable space, divided into 3 partitions, 20 gigs, 20 gigs and 36.2 gigs.
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You don't loose anything

Postby icecube » Sat Aug 28, 2004 5:24 am

A megabyte is two to the 20th power, or 1,048,576 bytes.

The people that sell the hard drives round it to 1,000,000 It makes a drive look bigger.

So it depends on whether your in the base 10 or base 2 number system. Thats where the shrinkage is. 160 gig drive is about 152 gig as far as fdisk is concerned (educated guess, I didn't use a calculator)
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